Drafting and Design

Knobb Hill offers drafting services for purposes of historic documentation in addition to design services for new construction.  Our scaled, three dimensional drawings are often used in conjunction with written documentation by those seeking grant assistance.  These drawings also serve as ‘blue prints’ for restoration projects.  As with much of our joinery work, we have been accustomed to doing things the ‘old-fashioned’ way.  It took a bit of convincing for us to shift our drafting work away from the drawing board and onto the computer.  The advantages of the three dimensional design are undeniable but we still have a soft spot for hand drawing and are glad to do so upon request.

We offer design services for the construction of new residential structures and out buildings.    We have often been called upon to work in collaboration with homeowners to help define goals and uses of space in addition to drafting the joinery and architectural style of the new structure.  Although we specialize in pre-civil war styles of architecture, we are not afraid to bend the rules of specific architectural styles or create entirely unique structures.  Our approach to architecture is informed by old traditions of mathematical proportioning.  We often draw directly from the five classical orders of architecture as well as the neo-classical interpretations of the orders as found in New England’s historic vernacular architecture.  Over the past few years, we have been exploring the almost forgotten art of daisy wheel design and found that many of the earliest structures in Vermont use this simple method to define their proportions.  We often use the daisy wheel to define the foot print and basic proportion of new structures and then apply either proportions of the classical orders or to a lesser extent, attributes of the romantic styles of architecture to define fenestration and other embellishments.

Many of the drafts in the gallery below correspond to frames found on the projects page of this site.

Drafting and Design Portfolio

Drafting & Design
Comparison of two different roof pitches for a residence in Marshfield.

Comparison of two different roof pitches for a residence in Marshfield.
The S.B.F. Abbot frame.

The S.B.F. Abbot frame.
The addition to the Theodore Wood House.

The addition to the Theodore Wood House.
The new barn at High Ledge Farm.

The new barn at High Ledge Farm.
The frame at Harlow Brook Farm.

The frame at Harlow Brook Farm.
The Fitch barn at Kents corner showing the original English Threshing barn in green and moved parts in blue.

The Fitch barn at Kents corner showing the original English Threshing barn in green and moved parts in blue.
Detail of the cupola at the Fitch barn.

Detail of the cupola at the Fitch barn.
The original configuration of the English barn before the 1855 expansion of the Fitch barn.

The original configuration of the English barn before the 1855 expansion of the Fitch barn.
Detail of the frame and offset from the house at Fowler Rd in Plainfield.

Detail of the frame and offset from the house at Fowler Rd in Plainfield.
Carriage house at Harlow Brook Farm.

Carriage house at Harlow Brook Farm.
Bank barn in Northfield.

Bank barn in Northfield.
Bank barn in Bradford.

Bank barn in Bradford.
Aisle barn in Cabot.

Aisle barn in Cabot.
Cabot aisle barn with sheathed roof.

Cabot aisle barn with sheathed roof.
Tithe style barn.

Tithe style barn.
Tithe barn plate elevations

Tithe barn plate elevations
Early English barn converted to a bank barn.

Early English barn converted to a bank barn.
Post elevations of the gould barn.

Post elevations of the gould barn.
One room school house in Calais.

One room school house in Calais.
A scribe-ruled barn in Woodstock.

A scribe-ruled barn in Woodstock.
A small sugar house in Northfield.

A small sugar house in Northfield.
A scribe ruled English barn.

A scribe ruled English barn.
An aisle barn in Corinth.

An aisle barn in Corinth.
Detail of the gable for a home in Marshfield.

Detail of the gable for a home in Marshfield.
 


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