High Ledge Farm, Woodbury, VT

Project Overview

In the spring of 2009, a fire caused by a faulty propane tank devastated High Ledge Farm of Woodbury, VT.  Owners Kate Camellitti and Paul Betz lost their house, greenhouses, a barn and other outbuildings to the fire.   Seth Kelley collaborated with Kate and Paul to design and construct a new barn.  The new barn will provide shop and storage space as well as processing space for produce.

The new barn measures thirty feet by forty feet and has a large knee wall to provide a spacious second story.  This frame has full length timbers throughout with the exception of its fully supported sills.  Downward bracing and a step lapped purlin system ensure that this new barn will endure for many generations.

Be sure to look for Kate & Paul at the farmers market in Montpelier!

Project Pictures

High Ledge Farm, Woodbury, VT
Seth Kelley making oak pegs for the frame.

Seth Kelley making oak pegs for the frame.
Michael Cuba cuts step laps in a forty foot long plate.

Michael Cuba cuts step laps in a forty foot long plate.
A tie beam shoulder is cut square.

A tie beam shoulder is cut square.
Seth Kelley adds a mortise to one of the plates.

Seth Kelley adds a mortise to one of the plates.
The rafters are relieved with an adze at the purlin plate.

The rafters are relieved with an adze at the purlin plate.
An unexpected snowfall covers the first assembled bent.

An unexpected snowfall covers the first assembled bent.
Floor joists are flown into place before the plates are added.

Floor joists are flown into place before the plates are added.
The floor joists of the house were incorporated into the frame.

The floor joists of the house were incorporated into the frame.
A forty foot plate is flown into place.

A forty foot plate is flown into place.
The second plate is lowered into position.

The second plate is lowered into position.
The gable bent of the purlinn system is flown into place.

The gable bent of the purlinn system is flown into place.
Except for the the gable bents, the purlin system was assembled and flown in as a unit.

Except for the the gable bents, the purlin system was assembled and flown in as a unit.
Step laps were cut in all four plates.

Step laps were cut in all four plates.
Michael shaves down a rafter before placing it in the step lap.

Michael shaves down a rafter before placing it in the step lap.
Our crane operator Bill Cassidy keeps his wheels squeaky clean.

Our crane operator Bill Cassidy keeps his wheels squeaky clean.
The steps laps in both plates can be seen at the gable.

The steps laps in both plates can be seen at the gable.
The frame is nearly complete.

The frame is nearly complete.
   


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